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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt. found in the catalog.

Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt.

Naphtali Lewis

Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt.

by Naphtali Lewis

  • 165 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by American Society of Papyrologists in New Haven .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Egypt
    • Subjects:
    • Egypt -- Officials and employees.,
    • Egypt -- Politics and government -- 332-30 B.C.,
    • Egypt -- Politics and government -- 30 B.C.-640 A.D.

    • Edition Notes

      SeriesAmerican studies in papyrology,, v. 3
      ContributionsAmerican Society of Papyrologists.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsJC66 .L47
      The Physical Object
      Pagination1 v. (loose-leaf)
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4433307M
      LC Control Number79081536

      EINGEGANGENE B (bis Januar ) CHER Bagnall, R. S., The Florida Ostraka (0. Florida). Documents from the Roman Army in Upper Egypt. (Greek, Roman and Byzantine Monograph 7). Durham: Duke University VIII, 74 S* 16 Taf. mit 31 Abb. Chartae Latinae Antiquiores. Facsimile-Edition of the Latin Charters Prior to the Ninth Gen' tury ed. by A. Bruckner and R. Marichal. Part VIII: The United. Yale Papyri in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library I, ed. J.F. Oates, A.E. Samuel and C.B. Welles. New Haven and Toronto (= P. Yale 1) Inventory of Compulsory Services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt, by N. Lewis. The Taxes in Grain in Ptolemaic Egypt: Granary Receipts from Diospolis Magna, B.C., by Z.M. Packman.

      Essay. The Arc of Egyptian and Greek Interaction in the First Millennium Preludes to Greek presence in Egypt are seen in the land reclamation and settlement of the western Delta beginning in the Third Intermediate Period and the new prominence of that area with the capital of Dynasty 26 at Sais. From the seventh century B.C., Egyptian rulers encouraged a flourishing Mediterranean trade. This is a reprint of Naphtali Lewis' important book on the uses of papyrus records reconstructing life in ancient Egypt. Published in , the first edition of Greeks in Ptolemaic Egypt complemented `Life in Egypt under Roman Rule' (reprinted in as `Classics in Papyrology 1') by providing a perspective on the earlier period. The author presents a series of portraits, describing the lives.

      I, Life in Egypt under Roman Rule, by N. Lewis (reprint of the Oxford University Press edition of ). II, Greeks in Ptolemaic Egypt, by N. Lewis (reprint of the Oxford University Press edition of ). Inventory of Compulsory Services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt, by N. Lewis. The Taxes in Grain in Ptolemaic Egypt: Granary Receipts from Diospolis Magna, B.C., by Z.M. Packman. Euripides Papyri I, Texts from Oxyrhynchus, by B.E. Donovan. s [ edit ].


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Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt by Naphtali Lewis Download PDF EPUB FB2

Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (American studies in papyrology) [Lewis, Naphtali] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (American studies in papyrology)Author: Naphtali Lewis.

Includes the author's Inventory of compulsory public services (=ICS2)--in book format, updated from his Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (=ICS), published in looseleaf as v. 3 of American studies in papyrology (); Appendix A is reprinted from the latter.

Lewis, Inventory of Compulsory Services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (by J. Thomas) A. McCann, The Portraits of Septimius Severus (by Malcolm A. Colledge) M. McGann, Studies in Horace's First Book of Epistles (by Gordon Williams) single book produced in the years is the late Professor Braunert's Die Binnenwanderung, a massive study on social mobility in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt as manifested in evidence for population Inventory of Compulsory Services (Toronto Amer.

Stud. Pap. Cited by: Inventory of Compulsory Public Services of Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (New Haven: American Society of Papyrologists, ); see also S. Llewelyn, "The Development of the System of Litur-gies," in New Documents Illustrating Early Christianity, vol.

7, A Review of the Greek Inscriptions. Archives in the Ancient World. See all formats and pricing eBook (PDF) Reprint Free shipping for non-business customers when ordering books at De Gruyter Online. Please find details to Contact Persons; Previous chapter.

Next chapter. Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt. $ / 30,00 € / £ Get Access to Full Text. Citation. Heating the baths during the Ptolemaic and Roman periods in Egypt: Comparing the archaeobotanical and textual data January In book: Collective Baths in Egypt 2 (pp).

Derchain, ; L. KOENEN et L. DOUTRELEAU, Nouvel inventaire des papyrus de Toura. Recherches de science religieusepar J. Van Haelst, ; N. LEWIS, Inventory of Compulsory Services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (New Haven - Toronto, ), par J. Bingen, ; G. MICHAILIDIS, Éléments de synthèse religieuse gréco-égyptienne.

Ptolemaic Egypt began when a follower of Alexander the Great Ptolemy I Soter declared himself Pharaoh of Egypt in BC and ended with the death of Queen Cleopatra VII and the Roman conquest in 30 BC.

The Ptolemaic Kingdom was a powerful Hellenistic state, extending from southern Syria in the east, to Cyrene to the west, and south to the frontier with Nubia. As Rome overtook the Ptolemaic system in place for areas of Egypt, they made many changes.

The effect of the Roman conquest was at first to strengthen the position of the Greeks and of Hellenism against Egyptian influences. Some of the previous offices and names of offices under the Hellenistic Ptolemaic rule were kept, some were changed, and some names would have remained but the.

Get this from a library. Inventory of Compulsory Services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt. [Naphtali Lewis]. Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt (OCoLC) Material Type: Updating loose-leaf: Document Type: Continually Updated Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Naphtali Lewis; American Society of Papyrologists.

Egypt passed to Ptolemy I Soter who proclaimed himself King of Egypt in BC and founded the 31st dynasty commonly referred as Ptolemaic Dynasty which ruled Egypt until the Roman conquest in 30 BC. Ptolemaic Egypt reached its height under rule of the first Ptolemaic pharaohs - Ptolemy I, Ptolemy II and Ptolemy III.

Chapter 8 () is the summary conclusion of this book. Monson shows great expertise and familiarity with the sources and issues under investigation and points to future questions for research on Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt.

Anyone following this line of research may greatly benefit from consulting this book. Notes. One of the models he. The compulsory public services of Roman Egypt. [Naphtali Lewis] Book: All Authors / Contributors: Naphtali Lewis.

Find more Language Note: English and Greek. Description: pages ; 31 cm. Contents: Inventory of compulsory public services --Appendix A. Ptolemaic Egypt --Appendix B. Exemption from liturgy in Roman Egypt.

I --Appendix C. Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt, (American Studies in Papyrology, volume three) by N. Lewis Inventory of compulsory services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt, (American Studies in Papyrology, volume three) by N. Lewis (pp. Sijpesteijn, p.

I am unable to find the evidence for N. Lewis' statement (Inventory of Compulsory Services in Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt, American Studies in Papyrology III, s.v. Karaanopek, κατασπορβύς 5) that the term of this liturgical office is one year.

The help of W. Willis of Duke University in preparing this. View Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt Research Papers on for free. Egypt in the Era of Hosni Mubarak – by Galal Amin, Cairo, American University in Cairo Press,pp. Article in The Developing Economies 50(4) December with Reads.

Chapter Three Ptolemaic and Roman Soldiers in Egypt before and after 30 BC Augustan Egypt: The Creation of a Roman Province Auletes Bagnall BGU TV BGUIV BGUVIII BGUXVI Bowman Caesar called capitation taxes census century BC Chapter chora Claudius Cleopatra compulsory services continued conventus dioiketes documents drachmas earliest.

The dynasty Ptolemy founded in Egypt was known as the line of Ptolemaic pharaohs and endured until the suicide of Cleopatra in 30 B.C., at which time direct Roman control was instituted.

The early Ptolemies were hardheaded administrators and business people, anxious to make the state that they created stable, wealthy, and influential.Start studying Ptolemaic Egypt.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.Chapter 6 contrasts the differences in government from the Ptolemaic to the Roman period concerning the temples, priestly offices and administration in general.

The fundamental changes under Roman administration were the introduction of compulsory services (liturgies) and a more efficient bureaucracy.